PATREON POSTS:
CLICK HERE TO ENTER THE LANCESCURV CONFERENCE LINE WHEN LIVE.

POSSESSING A VENOM FILLED SPIRIT WILL NEVER ALLOW YOU TO LIVE A LONG FRUITFUL LIFE! – ROOFTOP # 56

Envy is often rooted in low self-esteem – sometimes from very early unmet childhood needs where the person feels inherently not good enough. An envious person may frequently ‘compare and despair’ and find themselves wanting. And so they seek to bring down the object or person who they perceive is making them feel that way. It’s almost as though the other person is responsible for the envious person’s happiness – because their self-image is dependent on things outside of themselves. They feel deficient in themselves and have a constant hunger to fill that deficiency.

By denigrating the thing that makes them feel ‘less than’, the envious person can make the other feel bad, so they can ultimately begin to feel ‘more than’. It’s a shaky way of building self-esteem, but it’s as though the envious person needs to absorb some of the other’s energy in order to feel whole and functioning. Except the ‘feel good’ effect never lasts, and they may need to up the ante to continue to feel better about themselves. Envious people can be competitive. More than that, they can seem to take pleasure in another’s misfortune. We see this kind of envious attack carried out on social media daily, where celebrities’ looks and behaviours are criticised – and the tiniest slip is magnified and vilified.

An envy attack can involve:
Putting you down – either overtly, or subtly.
Provoking a reaction in you, from anger to sadness to outrage – then standing back and watching sparks fly.
Undermining your opinion or stance so you begin to doubt yourself.
Showing off about their own achievements, or the accomplishments of their children or other family members, even when rather modest.
Using sarcasm – disguised as ‘humour’– to poke fun at your achievements and mock what you believe in. This can feel humiliating.
Copying you – or pre-empting you beyond the limit of simple flattery. You invest in a new kitchen, they’ll get an extension and conservatory. You buy a new car, they’ll buy a bigger and better one.
Passively waiting until you slip up, and they’ll be gleefully ready to say” “I told you so”.
Generally just making you feel bad about yourself.
How to survive an envy attack:
If you start to feel small, this is what the envious person wants. Try to catch that feeling of diminishing yourself and stop yourself from doing it.
Don’t let their insults stick. Smile and nod and show that their words aren’t getting to you.
Don’t make apologies for who you are and what you do. You don’t have to hide your good fortunes just because you fear someone will swoop down and punish you for them.
Don’t retaliate by criticising them too.
Remind the envious person of their own strengths and successes. Encourage them to count their own blessings.
Create ways to protect your energies from being sucked out of you. Think about visualising yourself in a protective bubble, so any envy attack coming your way can bounce off you.
Ultimately, choose to hang out with people who make you feel good about yourself, rather than those who deplete you.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE

About The Author

LANCESCURV IS A MASTER STORYTELLER | SOCIAL MEDIA PROVOCATEUR | ILLUSTRATOR/CARTOONIST | PODCASTER | CULTURE CRITIC | DIGITAL NOMAD | BLOGGER | EXTROVERTED RECLUSE | FOCUSING ON THE INTRICACIES OF HUMAN NATURE, TRENDING NEWS & THOUGHT-PROVOKING TOPICS OF INTEREST. CONTACT: [email protected]

Related posts

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
LANCESCURV: RAW COMMENTARY | CULTURE | NEWS | OPINION!
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x